The Importance of Infertility Advocacy for Advocacy Day

This Wednesday our Executive Director, Erin Lasker, joins RESOLVE: The National Infertility Association as they head to Capitol Hill to lead volunteer advocates from all over the country to advocate for the infertility community.

This year, the focus issues are on getting an infertility tax credit reintroduced into Congress and getting the Women Veterans and Other Health Care Improvements Act passed this legislative session. You can learn more about this year’s Advocacy Day issues here.

The Importance of Infertility Advocacy for Advocacy Day | RESOLVE New England

By Keiko Zoll

What is Advocacy Day?

RESOLVE: The National Infertility Association brings delegates from every state in the nation to Washington D.C. once a year to talk to legislators and staffers about key infertility community issues. Those delegates are regular men and women just like you and me. RESOLVE provides training, talking points and resources to help these volunteer advocates engage with their elected officials.

Why does infertility advocacy matter?

When we think of infertility, sometimes we think about all the things it has taken away from us: our fertility, our sense of control in our lives and of our bodies, sometimes even our hopes and plans. Infertility can make us weary, stressed, sad, numb, frustrated, jaded, angry, confused, scared, restless… the list goes on. For some, infertility leaves a sense of emptiness inside them. For others, infertility is less a sense of emptiness but more of a constant reminder that shadows them wherever they go.

Raising awareness and advocating for infertility treatment, coverage, and research has given me back a lot of the things that felt taken from me. I feel like I’ve regained a sense of control and that I’m engaged in meaningful, purpose-driven work. I know advocacy isn’t for everyone, but I can’t deny how much of a positive impact is has not only made on my personal infertility journey, but in my life.

Why does Advocacy Day matter?

It might seem intimidating and overwhelming to head to our nation’s capitol to speak to legislators about our needs as a community, but it can be a powerful, incredible experience for those who participate. There’s incredible power sitting in a room full of advocates from around the country, all focused on talking to their legislators about what matters to this group. Even if you don’t get to meet every single person there, just sitting in that room and sharing that energy – it’s amazing.

And the most important thing: our legislators want to hear from us. They are in fact, willing to listen to our concerns, so Advocacy Day is so vital to making sure that our elected officials actually listen and hear our voices on the issues important to this community.

How can I get involved?

There are plenty of ways to get involved with Advocacy Day whether you’re headed to Washington or participating from your own local community!

  • Join RESOLVE on Capitol Hill on Wednesday, May 8th!
    If you can make it to D.C., you can still get involved by meeting with your legislators and their staffers on Capitol Hill this Wednesday. Head to RESOLVE to sign up!
  • Donate your Facebook and Twitter status to RESOLVE on Wednesday.
    Using Thunderclap, you can quickly log on and sign up to donate your Facebook or Twitter status in a unified social media blast on Advocacy Day! Thunderclap will go ahead and post for you, showing your support for the Advocacy Day issues. Click here to join the Thunderclap movement!
  • Write or call your elected officials on Wednesday.
    Even though you might not be able to meet them in their Washington offices, you can still email or call or elected officials on Advocacy Day. Talk to them about the infertility tax credit and Women Veterans and Other Health Care Improvements Act and why these pieces of legislation are important to you.

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